Abbreviations dating ad

The abbreviation BCE, just as with BC, always follows the year number.

Unlike AD, which traditionally precedes the year number, CE always follows the year number (if context requires that it be written at all).

The abbreviations are sometimes written with small capital letters, or with periods (e.g., " Several languages other than English also have both religious and non-religious ways of identifying the era used in dates. (nach Christus/Christi Geburt, after Christ/the Nativity of Christ).

Though there are a few frequently cited inflection points in that history—recorded instances of particular books using one system or another—the things that happened in the middle, and how and when new systems of dating were adopted, remain uncertain. Some might also count based on what year of an emperor’s reign it was.

Egyptians also used a variation on this system, counting years based on years of a king’s rule (so, an event might be dated to the 5th year of someone’s rule) and then keeping a list of those kings.

For example, the 2007 World Almanac was the first edition to switch over to the BCE/CE usage, ending a 138-year usage of the traditional BC/AD dating notation.

It is used by the College Board in its history tests, and by the Norton Anthology of English Literature. The US-based History Channel uses BCE/CE notation in articles on non-Christian religious topics such as Jerusalem and Judaism.

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